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27 Oct - Inspiration

The Gothic Farmhouse

This year has been a year of the dark, interesting interior. One particular style we have been drawn towards is that of barn conversions with Tudor styling; what we like to call ‘The Gothic Farmhouse’ look. This look tends towards dark grey tones, painted floorboards, exposed rustic bricks and exquisite dark finished metals not to mention the classic arched framed doors, raw black cast iron and medieval detailing associated with the Gothic style. Now we’ve got your attention, you’re probably wondering how you incorporate such grand features into your home without ‘overdoing it’. The Gothic Farmhouse is part barn, part Tudor mansion making for a wonderful fusion, don’t be afraid to pick and choose the features that suit you. A Gothic style framed window, for example, would not go a miss in a country cottage as it would add a touch of splendour and glamour without imposing on space.

Panelled interior for Gothic Farmhouse look
Arch way for Gothic Farmhouse Look

The history of this style is fascinating. Beginning in 1485 and continuing right up until 1603, the original Tudor styling has experienced many successful revivals. Some of the features that keep coming back are relatively easy to replicate in your home such as tapestries and embroidery to decorate the walls as well as heavy benches and encaustic tiles. The blend of various textures such as velvet, damasks and brocade fabrics that would have created a warm interior in an otherwise chilly Tudor home are materials that are ideal to use as throws for sofas or cushions on dining room chairs. The distinctive Gothic metals like black iron, dark brass and copper metals are wonderful elements to create features from throughout your home but especially in the bathroom where they can really make an impact when set against marble tops and white tiles.

Grand fireplace for Gothic Farmhouse look
Green bedroom for Gothic Farmhouse look

Of course the bathroom was not really a room per se in the 1500’s, however, by incorporating something of the essence of the time in to your bathroom décor you can achieve your own modern take on the Gothic look. Our two case studies below, the Mews House on the left and Cloakroom Bathroom on the right, highlight the use of dark colours with mixed textures and accessories effectively bring the Gothic style up to date.

Looking for more bathroom décor inspiration? Take a look at our previous design post where we reveal our love for wallpaper in the bathroom and why you should consider it for your next renovation.

Written by Senior Designer Tommy Bendall